Buddhist Festivals in India


buddhist-festival

Buddhist festivals of India are no exception to these. Being the land of the Buddha, India celebrates all those days as festivals that mark important days in the life of the Lord. Apart from this, there are also festival days that celebrates Buddha's teaching and spiritual community.

The Buddhist festivals in India are a joyful time for the Buddhist community. It is for them a time to dance and rejoice. You can be a part of this celebration if you plan your trip to the country around the date of these festivals. This section on Buddhist Festivals tries to introduce you to all these festivals. It gives you the details of the festivals, why and how they are celebrated and also the upcoming date of that festival.

Buddh Purnima:

perhaps the most significant and revered of all the festivals that are celebrated in the Buddhist faith, it is also known as Buddha Jayanti, or Vesak, and is celebrated far and wide all across Asia, and even in parts of the western world. It is the celebration of the Buddha’s last piece of advice to his Sangha (disciples), that the Dharma (teachings) should thenceforth be regarded as their teacher, since it is the only truth not subject to the wheel of change.
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Hemis:

the Hemis festival is celebrated every year in June in the Hemis Monastery in Ladakh situated 45 km from Leh, the monastery was re-established in 1672 by the Ladakhi king Sengge Namgyal. The Hemis Festival is a 2-day long cultural extravaganza. This festival is dedicated to the birth of the sage Guru Padmasambhava venerated as the Dance Performance at Hemis Monastery representative reincarnate of Buddha.
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Ullambana:

This is a festival that strives to relieve aching souls from suffering. It is believed that on this day, the gates of Hell open, and the dead are allowed to visit their loved ones on earth. Originally, it was an Indian festival for Buddhist meant to celebrate a day of joy in the Buddha’s life, as gathered from scriptures of the time, the cause of which was the large number of his disciples that attained enlightenment during this period, that is, the seventh lunar month.
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Losar:

Although the celebration of Losar is largely a Tibetan tradition to bring in the New Year, and predates Buddhism, it is generally believed that during the reign of the ninth king of Tibet, King Pude Gungyal, it underwent a permutation to become an annual Buddhist festival. Some believes that - In ancient times when the peach tree was in blossom, it was considered as the starting of a new year for them. As per Tibetan calendar in 1027 A.D. the first day of the first month came to be fixed as the day of New Year .
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Asalha Day:

this is the day when the Buddha delivered what may well be referred to as his first sermon in Sarnath . Sarnath is about 12 KM far from Varanasi. It was given to a gathering of five friends, and is widely believed to have established the foundation of Buddhist teaching.
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Sangha Day/Magha Puja:

Sangha Day is a day in the month of February that is dedicated to honouring the Sangha, or the disciples of the faith. After the three month meditation which saw the enlightenment of many disciples and left the Buddha highly pleased, he arrived at the city of Rajagaha. Seeing how his arrival in the city was unprecedented, the gathering of over 1200 arahats (high priests) to pay him respect was also entirely unprecedented and spontaneous.
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Buddhist Tourist Pilgrimage in India

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